FEATURED

 

 

UMLR Proudly Presents its Candidate Class for Volume 72

 

 

The University of Miami Law Review is thrilled to welcome the newest candidates to the UMLR family and network. Congratulations to the following candidates; we look forward to working with you! Bettge, Paige Bielski, Keelin Cheney, Megan Dilts, Nicholas Dudley, Alexander Feldman, Sydney Frucht, Maya * Grzelak, Filip * Guernsey, Daniel Jorgensen, Josephine * Kasten, Fredric * […]

 

 

Volume 71, Issue 3 Released

 

 

UMLR is proud to announce that Volume 71, Issue 3 is available on our website here.  Feel free to browse the collection of essays, articles and notes covering a range of topics such as workers’ rights, patent alienability and gun regulation. UMLR dedicated countless hours to bring Issue 3 to fruition and we are proud of the final product. […]

 

 

UMLR INSIGHTS

 

 

UMLR Proudly Presents its Candidate Class for Volume 72

 

 

The University of Miami Law Review is thrilled to welcome the newest candidates to the UMLR family and network. Congratulations to the following candidates; we look forward to working with you! Bettge, Paige Bielski, Keelin Cheney, Megan Dilts, Nicholas Dudley, Alexander Feldman, Sydney Frucht, Maya * Grzelak, Filip * Guernsey, Daniel Jorgensen, Josephine * Kasten, Fredric * […]

 

 

Married on Saturday, Fired on Monday

 

 

JOANNE SCHIFFER—Over the past few decades, there has been an ongoing debate over what it means to discriminate “because of . . . sex” under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Title VII states: It shall be an unlawful employment practice for an employer – (1) to fail or refuse to hire […]

 

 

FOIA: So Hot Right Now

 

 

JENNY LEDIG—A president riding into office on the mantra “drain the swamp” might suggest an administration that would embrace the purpose of the Freedom of Information Act, facilitating government transparency and accountability. But now, after President Trump’s 100th day in office, his team so far shows no intention of increasing transparency under his administration. History […]

 

 

“So what?” – The Internet of Things & Privacy Rights Apathy in the Age of Trump

 

 

NICOLE CHIPI—On February 17, 2017, the Bundesnetzagentur (Germany’s telecommunications watchdog) issued an official warning to the citizens of Germany, banning a product it declared a threat to the private sphere. Jochen Homann, the agency’s president, added that the ban was “about protecting the rights of the weakest in society.” What was this unauthorized wireless transmitting […]

 

 

A De Novo Critique of Administrative Deference

 

 

LUIS M. REYES—Administrative agencies are lawmaking bodies created by Congress and are entrusted to enforce the mandates of particular congressional statutes. Yet because these statutes often terse or vague, agencies also promulgate new rules and regulations to supplement ambiguities. The judicially created doctrine of administrative deference serves to give the benefit of the doubt to […]

 

 

The Emperor Has No (Obligation to) Close: When Seemingly Innocuous Closing Conditions Add to the Deal Risks They Are Intended to Protect Against

 

 

SAM GOODMAN—In a highly anticipated decision on a contested merger agreement, the Delaware Supreme Court affirmed the Delaware Court of Chancery’s ruling that acquiror Energy Transfer Equity L.P. (“ETE”) did not breach its agreement to merge with the Williams Companies, Inc. (“Williams”) when ETE terminated the merger agreement because its counsel was unwilling to deliver […]

 

 

Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea: The Hard Choice Between Health and Privacy

 

 

CHRISTOPHER J. FRAGA—Ross Compton recently plead not guilty to aggravated arson and insurance fraud charges deriving from the destruction of his $400,000 home. According to Mr. Compton, he packed a few bags and used his cane to break a window in order to escape after discovering a fire. Unfortunately for Mr. Compton, his pacemaker told […]

 

 

 

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