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UMLR 2016 Symposium Topic Announced!

 

 

The University of Miami Law Review is proud to announce its 2016 symposium topic: “The Constitution on Campus: Do Students Shed Their Rights at the Schoolhouse Gates?” The Symposium will explore how far constitutional protections extend on a college campus by taking an in-depth look at free speech, equal protection, and due process issues. The […]

 

 

New York Times Examines John Paul Stevens’ Retirement and UMLR Symposium Appearence

 

 

Recently, Linda Greenhouse wrote an article about the retired Justice John Paul Stevens, which was titled “Speaking Truth to the Supreme Court.” The article, featured in the New York Times, was offered as an early birthday present to the 95-year-old Stevens, and it describes the refreshing retirement style of the seemingly ageless former Justice. For […]

 

 

UMLR INSIGHTS

 

 

Rodriguez v. United States: Does the Fourth Amendment Permit Suspicionless Dog Sniffs After a Completed Traffic Stop?

 

 

BY JANELLY CRESPO — On January 21, 2015, the Supreme Court heard oral argument in Rodriguez v. United States, a case that will help define the proper limits of a traffic stop, including whether officers can extend a traffic stop to conduct a dog sniff. The Court granted certiorari in order to consider whether officers […]

 

 

Arizona State Legislature v. Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission: Will the Supreme Court Put a Rubber Stamp on Political Gerrymandering?

 

 

BY RAVIKA RAMESHWAR — State safeguards to prevent partisan gerrymandering are facing a constitutional hurdle in Arizona State Legislature v. Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission. The United States Supreme Court heard oral arguments on Monday, May 4, 2015, to determine if states have the right to limit or abolish state legislative authority to draw boundaries for […]

 

 

Obamagration: The Latest Impending Legal Battle for the Obama Administration

 

 

BY TAYLOR SCHMALTZ — Is the immigration system broken? President Obama seems to think so. On November 20, 2014, President Obama announced an executive action that would sharply divide the people, the lawmakers, and the courts of this nation. The executive action was set to take effect on February 18, 2015, but its implementation by […]

 

 

The Fight Against Affirmative Action Continues: Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, Round Two

 

 

BY CAITLIN GILES — Many are familiar with Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin (Fisher I), the lawsuit that challenged the University of Texas (“UT”) at Austin’s use of racial preferences in its admissions system. The case went all the way to the Supreme Court in 2013 before being remanded back to the Fifth Circuit. […]

 

 

The Silk Road Kingpin and the Legal Implications of His Conviction

 

 

BY PAT MCBRIDE – On February 4, 2015, Ross Ulbricht was convicted on seven federal charges ranging from money laundering and hacking to trafficking forged identities and distribution of narcotics. These charges could carry a sentence of up to life in prison. Ulbricht was convicted of being the founder and kingpin of the Silk Road Bazaar—a […]

 

 

The Miami Police Department’s New Public Surveillance Cameras: Could the Constitution Prevent “Big Brother’s” Short Term Visit From Becoming Permanent?

 

 

BY BRENDAN M. STUDLEY — Living in Downtown Miami is a slice of paradise for many of Florida’s sun-kissed residents and tourists alike. With beautiful sandy beaches and year-round warm weather, residential paradises like Miami are far and few between. But the next time you venture out for a night on the town or some […]

 

 

Meditating Your Way to the End Zone Without a Flag: Take a Page from Coach Carroll’s Playbook and Practice Mindfulness in Law

 

 

BY IVANA K. ALVAREZ — The Seattle Seahawks made it all the way to the Super Bowl this year. What is the secret behind their collective ability to think more clearly under pressure than other NFL teams? Meditation, encouraged by head coach Pete Carroll. Carroll arranges intentionally chaotic practice sessions for his team because he […]

 

 

Havana Rights: How Lifting the Cuban Embargo Could Affect Trademark Rights to the Cohiba Brand

 

 

BY DIANA JORDAN — Few trademarks rival the exclusivity of the Cohiba brand. But who should profit from the brand name cigars’ fame and notoriety? To resolve this decades-old dispute, American cigar manufacturer General Cigar and its Cuban counterpart, Cubatabaco, have decided to once again duke it out in classic American fashion—through litigation. In 1972, […]

 

 

Which Will be Healthier, State or Federal Exchanges: The Looming Implications of King v. Burwell

 

 

BY ANDREA NICKERSON — Although the Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“ACA”) and related statutes in National Federation of Independent Business, it will undoubtedly continue to address issues associated with the actual implementation of the statute. On November 7, the Court granted certiorari for King v. Burwell, […]

 

 

Free Speech Victory: Florida Bar Prohibition on Past Results Struck Down

 

 

BY DALISI OTERO — In Rubenstein v. Florida Bar, Judge Beth Bloom of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida ruled last month that the Florida Bar’s ban on attorneys’ use of past results for advertising is unconstitutional under the Free Speech Clause of the First Amendment. Judge Bloom concluded the […]

 

 

 

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